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Module Seven: Classroom Based Active Learning Strategies
Overview

Classroom Based Active Learning StrategiesThe engagement of students in classroom instruction is critical to facilitating learning. Active learning suggests students are involved in the process. The traditional lecture approach with the instructor as the subject matter expert and the passively listening does not foster active learning. In fact, studies suggest it does not foster learning at all! Most students do not retain lecture materials past ten minutes of learning.  Active learning requires instructors, and students, to venture outside of their comfort zone and become engaged with each other. This is often new for instructors whose graduate studies consisted predominately of passive learning. It is often new for students who attend class intent on passively taking notes.   

There are numerous strategies for active learning. These include simply strategies such as having students create learning objectives for the lecture or create a cognitive map of the key concepts or participate in reflective journaling.  Many active learning strategies require groups to discuss ideas, informally chat on defined topics, or collaborate to determine possible solutions.  In this section you will find some ‘how to’ ideas to begin integrating active learning strategies in your classroom.  These have been arranged based on activities that can be done early in the lecture, during the middle of the lecture, and at the end of the lecture. You will also find some helpful hints on using groups and peer assessments. Note, group work and peer assessments can be done in the classroom or via a course management system (CMS).

Active Learning Strategies

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The following learning strategies are from; Appendix One, Active Learning: Creating Excitement in the Classroom, C. C. Bonwell, Active Learning Workshops, PO Box 407, Green Mountain Falls, CO 80819, (719) 684-9261, email: bonwell@ix.netcom.com, www.active-learning-site.com
Initial Strategies

Middle Strategies

End Strategies


 
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