image
image


Resources for Module Nine Incorporating Academic Resources
 
Library Resources
Linked Resources

American Library Association. (1989). Presidential committee on information literacy: Final report. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/whitepapers/presidential
Defines information literacy and its critical importance to individuals, businesses/organizations, and an informed American citizenry. Identifies implications for educational institutions, describes a model “information age school,” and offers concluding recommendations.

American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries. (2012). Characteristics of programs of information literacy that illustrate best practices: A guideline. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/characteristics
Identifies characteristics of excellence for information literacy programs in two-year and four-year institutions of higher education, arranged by ten categories:  mission, goals and objectives, planning, administrative and institutional support, articulation (program sequence) within the curriculum, collaboration, pedagogy, staffing, outreach, and assessment/evaluation.

American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries. (2001). Objectives for information literacy instruction: A model statement for academic librarians. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/objectivesinformation
Enumerates library instruction session objectives for some of the higher education information literacy competency standards published in 2000 by the American Library Association’s Association of College and Research Libraries.

American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries. (2000). Information literacy competency standards for higher education. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ informationliteracycompetency
Identifies five competency standards for the information literate student, with accompanying performance indicators and outcomes. Introductory material notes endorsement by the American Association for Higher Education and the Council of Independent Colleges.

American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries, Anthropology and Sociology Section. (2008). Information literacy standards for anthropology and sociology students. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/anthro_soc_standards
Provides information literacy standards and key successful behaviors for anthropology and sociology students.

American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries, Education and Behavioral Sciences Section. (2011). Information literacy competency standards for journalism students and professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ ala.org.acrl/files/content/standards/ il_journalism.pdf
Provides information literacy standards, outcomes, and examples relevant for journalism students and professionals.

American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries, Education and Behavioral Sciences Section. (2010). Psychology information literacy standards. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/ acrl/standards/psych_info_lit
Provides information literacy standards, performance indicators, outcomes, and examples relevant to undergraduate psychology students.

American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries, Instruction Section. (n.d.). PRIMO: Peer-reviewed instructional materials online.  Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/ aboutacrl/directoryofleadership/sections/is/iswebsite/projpubs/primo
Provides a database of librarian-created resources for online information literacy instruction. Includes general and subject-specific materials.

American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries, Instruction Section. (n.d.). The first-year experience and academic libraries: A select, annotated bibliography. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl/directoryofleadership/sections/is/iswebsite/projpubs/tmcfyebib
Updated annually, this annotated bibliography on the first-year experience and academic libraries identifies a core collection and organizes additional resources according to category: assessment, case studies, collaborative initiatives, FYE-specific courses, online tutorials, outreach, pedagogy, peer training, related research, and strategies for integration.

American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries, Law and Political Science Section. (2008). Political science research competency guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/ acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/standards/PoliSciGuide.pdf
Provides information literacy standards, outcomes, and examples relevant to political science and to “public administration, law, criminal justice, and civic education.” Includes outcomes expertise indicators identified as faculty, librarian, or shared.

American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries, Literatures in English Section. (2007). Research competency guidelines for literatures in English. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/researchcompetenciesles
Identifies information literacy outcomes for undergraduate students majoring in English or American literature.

American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section. (2006). Information literacy standards for science and engineering/technology. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ infolitscitech
Provides information literacy standards, performance indicators, and outcomes specific to science, engineering, and technology, excluding mathematics.

American Library Association, Reference and User Services Association. (2004). Guidelines for behavioral performance of reference and information service providers. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/rusa/ resources/guidelines/guidelinesbehavioral
Identifies general, in-person, and remote behaviors librarians should exhibit in their interactions with library users, arranged in five categories: approachability, interest, listening/inquiring, searching, and follow-up.

Ariew, S. (n.d.). University of South Florida library instruction assessment clearinghouse. Retrieved from http://guides.lib.usf.edu/content.php?pid=84214&sid=625567
Identifies websites and resources on the improvement and assessment of library instruction. Includes professional resources, sample tools, recommended reading, and information on the use of teaching portfolios.

Bowles-Terry, M., Hensley, M., & Hinchliffe, L. (2010). Best practices for online video tutorials in academic libraries: A study of student preferences and understanding. Communications in Information Literacy, 4, 17-28. Retrieved from http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil
Reports on a study at University of Illinois library with resulting recommendations for library online video tutorials as to pace, length, content, look and feel, use of video vs. text, findability, and student interest.

Burke, M. (2011). Academic libraries and the credit-bearing class: A practical approach. Communications in Information Literacy, 5, 156-173. Retrieved from http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil
Identifies a number of trends among libraries offering credit-bearing information literacy courses. Areas of focus include course format, grade level, embedded librarians, whether courses were required, assessment, contribution to retention rates, adjunct instruction, funding, and connection to specific disciplines.

Carlson, J., & Kneale, R. (2011). Embedded librarianship in the research context: Navigating new waters. College & Research Libraries News, 72, 167-170. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/
Offers advice for embedded librarians providing research services to faculty or institutions, in terms of role, mindset, teamwork, risk tolerance, gaining trust, translating skills across disciplines, challenging oneself, and self-examination.

Farkas, M. (2012).Library success: A best practices wiki: Reference services and information literacy. Retrieved from http://www.libsuccess.org/
A space where libraries and librarians offer their experience, knowledge, and successes with the library community; wiki format with no restrictions on contributions; updated constantly.

Gibson, D., & Oakleaf, M. (2012). An essential partner: The librarian’s role in student learning assessment (National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment Occasional Paper No. 14). Retrieved from http://www.learningoutcomeassessment.org/documents/LibraryLO_000.pdf
Provides an overview of various information literacy student learning outcomes and assessment strategies developed by academic libraries, both for general educational purposes and subject-specific outcomes. Discusses librarian-faculty and student-library interactions, the respective impacts of these interactions on student success, and challenges that libraries face when engaging in learning outcomes assessment.

Kapoun, J. (2004). Assessing library instruction assessment activities. Library Philosophy and Practice, 7(1). Retrieved from http://unllib.unl.edu/LPP/
Reports on a project at Memorial Library, University of Minnesota, Mankato, to collect information on library instruction assessment from peer institutions. Analysis of 57 respondents focuses on whether the libraries assessed instruction, whom they assessed, and method and format of assessment.

Kent State University. (2012). Project SAILS: Standardized assessment of information literacy skills. Retrieved from https://www.projectsails.org/
SAILS is an assessment tool available for purchase by libraries; its test items are based on the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. Tests for both individuals and cohorts of students are available; the cohort tests are compared to benchmarks developed by SAILS. SAILS groups ACRL objectives into various skill sets such as “developing a research strategy” and “documenting sources,” among others. Project SAILS promises high validity and reliability of its tests.

Oakleaf, M. (2009). Writing information literacy assessment plans: A guide to best practice. Communications in Information Literacy, 3, 80-90. Retrieved from http://www.comminfolit.org/ index.php?journal=cil
Argues for the use of information literacy assessment plans that contain a number of elements, including purposes, theory, tools/methods, goals/outcomes, explanations of the relationship of the assessment to institutional strategies, and reports of results.

RAILS: Rubric assessment of information literacy skills. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://railsontrack.info/
The goal of the three-year RAILS project is to make a set of assessment rubrics for informational literacy outcomes for use by academic libraries.  When the project is finished, libraries will be able to use the rubrics and share local adaptations.

Shumaker, D. (2012). The embedded librarian: Exploring new, embedded roles for librarians in organizations of all types [Web log]. Retrieved from http://embeddedlibrarian.com/
This blog covers news, developments, and insights within the field of embedded library services, encompassing embedded instruction, reference, research, and faculty services. Maintained by David Shumaker, a professor at the School of Library and Information Science, Catholic University of America (Washington, DC).

 
Additional Resources

Accardi, M. T., Drabinski, E., & Kumbier, A. (Eds.). (2010). Critical library instruction: Theories and methods. Duluth, MN: Library Juice Press.

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Avery, S., & Ward, D. (2010). Reference is my classroom: Setting instructional goals for academic library reference services. Internet Reference Services Quarterly, 15, 35-51. doi:10.1080/10875300903530264

Badke, W. B. (2011). Research strategies: Finding your way through the information fog (4th ed.). Bloomington, IN: IUniverse.

Brasley, S. S. (2008). Effective librarian and discipline faculty collaboration models for integrating information literacy into the fabric of an academic institution. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 114, 71-88. doi:10.1002/tl.318

Burkhardt, J. M. (2010). Teaching information literacy: 50 standards-based exercises for college students (2nd ed.). Chicago, IL: American Library Association.

Clayton, S. J. (2007). Going the distance: Library instruction for remote learners. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman.

Daugherty, A., & Russo, M. F. (2007). Information literacy programs in the digital age: Educating college and university students online. Chicago, IL: Association of College and Research Libraries.

Gustavson, A., Whitehurst, A., & Hisle, D. (2011). Laying the information literacy foundation: A multiple-media solution. Library Hi Tech, 29, 725-740.  doi:10.1108/07378831111189796

Hardesty, L. L. (Ed.). (2007). The role of the library in the first college year. Columbia: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Hoffman, S. (2011). Embedded academic librarian experiences in online courses: Roles, faculty collaboration, and opinion. Library Management, 32, 444-456.

Hoffman, S., & Ramin, L. (2010). Best practices for librarians embedded in online courses. Public Services Quarterly, 6, 292-305. doi:10/1080/15228959.2010.497743

Hollister, C. V. (Ed.). (2010). Best practices for credit-bearing information literacy courses. Chicago, IL: American Library Association.

Isbell, D. (2008). What happens to your research assignment at the library? College Teaching, 56, 3-6. 
doi:10.3200/CTCH.56.1.3-6

Karshmer, E., & Bryan, J. E. (2011). Building a first-year information literacy experience: Integrating best practices in education and ACRL IL competency standards for higher education. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 37, 255-266.

Kesselman, M. A., & Watstein, S. B. (2009). Creating opportunities: Embedded librarians. Journal of Library Administration, 49, 383-400.

Knoer, S. (2011). The reference interview today. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.

Kovacs, D. K. (2007). The virtual reference handbook: Interview and information delivery techniques for the chat and e-mail environments. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman.

Kvenild, C., & Calkins, K. (2011). Embedded librarians: Moving beyond one-shot instruction. Chicago, IL: Association of College and Research Libraries.

Mackey, T. P., & Jacobson, T. E. (Eds.). (2010). Collaborative information literacy assessments: Strategies for evaluating teaching and learning. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman.

McAdoo, M. L. (2010). Building bridges: Connecting faculty, students, and the college library. Chicago, IL: American Library Association.

McDevitt, T. R. (Ed.). (2011). Let the games begin!: Engaging students with field-tested interactive information literacy instruction. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman.

Parker-Gibson, N. (2001). Library assignments: Challenges that students face and how to help. College Teaching, 49, 65-70. doi:10.1080/87567550109595850

Ross, C. S. (2009). Conducting the reference interview: A how-to-do-it manual for librarians (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Neal-Schuman.

Saunders, L. (2011). Information literacy as a student learning outcome: The perspective of institutional accreditation. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.

Sinkinson, C., Alexander, S., Hicks, A., & Kahn, M. (2012). Guiding design: Exposing librarian and student mental models of research guides. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 12, 63-84. doi:10.1353/pla.2012. 0008

Sitter, R. L., & Cook, D. (2009). Library instruction cookbook. Chicago, IL: Association of College and Research Libraries.

Smith, S. S. (2010). Web-based instruction: A guide for libraries (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: American Library Association.

Su, S-F., & Kuo, J. (2010). Design and development of web-based information literacy tutorials. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 36, 320-328. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2010.05.006

Wilkinson, C., & Bruch, C. (Eds.). (2012). Transforming information literacy programs: Intersecting frontiers of self, library culture, and campus community. Chicago, IL: Association of College and Research Libraries.

York, A. C., & Vance, J. M. (2009). Taking library instruction into the online classroom: Best practices for embedded librarians. Journal of Library Administration, 49, 197-209. doi:10.1080/01930820802312995

 

Previous Overview Next
image


image
image