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Module Two: The High School Syllabus For K-12
How Can My High School Syllabi Help My Students Develop College-Readiness Skills?

Syllabi in the high school share the function and some common elements to collegiate syllabi.  The syllabi is not the curriculum; it only reflects the performance expectations, time lines, assignment, and assessment of student learning. Many of the courses in high school receive dual, concurrent, or advanced academic credit for college and are required to follow the partnering college syllabi format.  For example, Advanced Placement (AP), courses that offer college credit opportunities through the College Board require a standardized syllabi in all courses that must be submitted to the College Board for approval.  It is common for course descriptions to be standardized in both high school and college.  Having standard elements in the syllabi is advantageous for students.

It is critical that educators in high school settings understand the importance of developing college-readiness in their students. Aligning high school courses and syllabi with college expectations will help students with the often difficult transition to college.  According to Conley (2007) very few high schools have aligned the curriculum, structure, and other elements to assist their students with the rapid tempo and competitive environment of most colleges. Analyzing the curriculum and working with the local colleges in the partnership of preparing students for their first year of college instead of their last year in high school can mitigate some of the gaps between these two institutions (Scherer, 2007, Conley, 2003, Conley, 2007, Haycock, Reed, Thornton, Gregory, 2006). 

How Can I Develop My Syllabi to Prepare Students for College?
Developing a high quality syllabi aligned to college expectations is an essential step to developing college-ready students. Because high school teachers are working with adolescents under their parent or guardians' care and supervision, the high school syllabi must include additional elements such as a "Parent as Partners" section recognizing the importance of this partnership. In addition, other high school syllabi components will be the district or campus grading procedures and state mandated curriculum requirements. Teachers can partner with their administrators, colleagues, and local colleges to develop quality syllabi for their courses. Table 1.0 is a sample high school syllabus containing elements aligning to typical college and high school requirements.

Syllabus Template aligned to NCATE requirements can be found at: http://www.loc.edu/academic-affairs/case/Syllabus%20Template.pdf

Reference List
 
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