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Module Ten: Types of Rubrics
 
In general, two types of rubrics are used by instructors: holistic and analytic.  With the holistic rubric, the instructors assess the student’s work as a whole (support broader judgments). With the analytic rubric, the instructors assess students work based on the components of a finish product (similar to a checklist). 
Holistic Rubric
A holistic rubric assigns a level of performance by assessing the assignment as a whole and often returns only one grade. Although the various evaluation criteria could be listed, the quality definitions are often brief, if there at all. Holistic rubrics are often used when the number of evaluation criteria is not relatively large and when quick judgments are needed. Also, there may be assignments where a certain evaluation criterion is dependent upon another criterion. For example, a person’s communication often can be heavily influenced by the use of visual aids. Figure 1 displays the generic framework of a holistic rubric for the fiction writing content. More examples of holistic rubrics for various disciplines can be found under the Examples of Rubrics.
 
Points If . . . .

5

The plot, setting, and characters are developed fully and organized well. The who, what, where, when, and why are explained using interesting language and sufficient detail.

4

Most parts of the story mentioned in a score of 5 above are developed and organized well. A couple of aspects may need to be more fully or more interestingly developed

3

Some aspects of the story are developed and organized well, but not as much detail or organization is expressed as in a score of 4.

2

A few parts of the story are developed somewhat. Organization and language usage need improvement.

1

Parts of the story are addressed without attention to detail or organization.
Figure 1. Holistic Rubric adapted from sample rubric in the TeacherVision website.
Experts Answer Questions
What type of assignments would be a good fit for holistic rubrics? (Mueller, 2002)
If you prefer text to audio, click here for answer
Analytic Rubric
An analytic rubric assigns a level of performance by assessing the assignment using segmentation, often returning one grade for each of the segments. Each evaluation criterion has various levels of performance evaluations that are then detailed with the quality definitions that much be accomplished to obtain that specific level. The structure of an analytic rubric consists of a grid with the criterion for a student product listed in the leftmost column and with levels of performance listed across the top row. The cells within the center of the rubric may or may not contain the quality descriptions for a specific level of performance in that evaluation criterion. When scoring with an analytic rubric, each of the evaluation criteria is scored individually.  Figure 2 displays a generic layout of an analytic rubric for the fiction writing content. More examples of holistic rubrics for various disciplines can be found under the Examples of Rubrics.
 

Criteria

4

3

2

1

PLOT: "What" and "Why" Both plot parts are fully developed. One of the plot parts is fully developed and the less developed part is at least addressed. Both plot parts are addressed but not fully developed. Neither plot parts are fully developed.
SETTING: "When" and "Where" Both setting parts are fully developed. One of the setting parts is fully developed and the less developed part is at least addressed. Both setting parts of the story are addressed but not fully developed. Neither setting parts are developed.
CHARACTERS: "Who" described by behavior, appearance, personality, and character traits The main characters are fully developed with much descriptive detail. The reader has a vivid image of the characters. The main characters are developed with some descriptive detail. The reader has a vague idea of the characters. The main characters are identified by name only. None of the characters are developed or named.
Figure 2. Analytic Rubric adapted from sample rubric in the TeacherVision website.
Experts Answer Questions
What type of assignments would be a good fit for analytic rubrics? (Mueller, 2002)
If you prefer text to audio, click here for answer
Rubrics – Holistic and Analytic
In this video, Dr. Susan McCahan from the Centre for Teaching Support and Innovation – University of Toronto, discusses the differences between holistic and analytic rubric.
   
 
   
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