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Module Ten: Using Rubrics in K-12 Student, Assessment for K-12
What Is a Rubric?
What Is a Rubric? A rubric is an effective teaching and learning tool that clearly aligns the content and performance expectations for student assessment.  By current definition, rubrics, which can be employed across any academic discipline; guide both the teacher and the student in the analysis and measurement of learning performance (Moskal, 2000, Hafner, 2003, Popham, 2003).    Rubrics are developed upon the fundamental constructs of constructivist and motivational learning theories for the assessment of prescribed learning expectations (Oakleaf, 2008, 2009).   According to Moskal, the rubric is a “descriptive scoring scheme” that can greatly aid the teacher in removing the ambiguity in the assessment process. 
Why Use a Rubric?
Rubrics provide students with clear expectations and outline the performance expectations for the assigned task.  Rubrics can mitigate the ambiguity sometimes associated with teacher expectations and student understandings.  They are also helpful in streamlining the review and assessment of student work. Rubrics are considered effective teaching practice in the K-12 classroom and provide formative assessment and feedback to students, parents, and teachers.
How Can I Put More Authentic and Performance-Based Assessments into My Instruction?

Authentic assessments can be any learning task that integrates the teacher's teaching with the learning and assessment of the student.  They are direct measures of the curriculum such as portfolios, observations, and performances.  Rubrics are an assessment instrument commonly used with these tasks and have been included within the authentic and performance-based assessment research (Andrade, 2000, Arter & McTighe, 2000, Wiggins, 1996, Stevens & Levi, 2005).  Rubrics clearly outline the expectations on the learning task allowing the student to know "what they are shooting for,” They are typically developed in a table format with a Likert style scoring guide (Arter & McTighe, 2000).  Using this format provides the learner with the opportunity to review and apply the related content that will be assessed against standardized performance expectations. A rubric is not intended to limit the capacity or performance of a student or group of students.  Therefore, it is prudent for the K-12 educator to include a brief statement such as the following: "The rubric is an authentic assessment tool used to define the criteria for a problem-solving activity.  It is a scoring guide used to evaluate a student's performance on the task but is not intended in any way to limit students in their personal goals of exceeding the outlined criteria in their finished product."  Tables 1.0 and 2.0 reflect samples of general assessment rubrics.

 

Table 1.0 Sample Generic Rubric

Project-Based Learning Rubric (Free Download from Microsoft Office)

Name:

 

Date:

 

Class:

 

Period:

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

Score

Content

Project is only partially complete.

Provides inconsistent information for solution.

Has no apparent application of critical thinking.

Is pulled from few sources.

Contains significant factual errors.

Supports the solution.

Application of critical thinking is apparent.

Is pulled from a limited number of sources.

Contains some minor factual errors.

Is well thought out and supports a solution.

Application of critical thinking is apparent.

Is pulled from several sources.

Is accurate.

Is well thought out and supports the solution relevant to the problem.

Reflects in-depth application of critical thinking.

Is pulled from a variety of sources.

Is accurate.

 

Conventions

Project is only partially complete.

 

More than 5 spelling, grammatical, or punctuation errors.

Poor use of vocabulary and word choice.

Minimal (3 to 5) spelling, grammatical, or punctuation errors.

Low-level use of vocabulary and word choice.

Few (1 to 3) spelling, grammatical, or punctuation errors.

Good use of vocabulary and word choice.

No spelling, grammatical, or punctuation errors.

High-level use of vocabulary and word choice.

 

Organization

Project is only partially complete.

 

Content is unfocused and haphazard.

Information does not support the solution to the problem.

Information has no apparent pattern.

Project has a focus but might stray at times.

Information appears to have a pattern, but is not consistently carried out.

Information loosely supports the solution.

Project is clearly focused and organized most of the time.

Information supports the solution.

Project is clearly focused in an organized and thoughtful manner.

Information is constructed in a logical pattern to support the solution.

 

Presentation
5 Pictures
1 Video
Bibliography

Project is only partially complete.

 

Multimedia is used haphazardly or looks sloppy/unfinished.

Presentation has no clear organization.

Speech is choppy, not practiced.

Speech does not capture audience attention.

Multimedia loosely illustrates main points.

Presentation is loosely organized.

Speech has long pauses, limited practice.

Some attempts to capture audience attention are made.

Multimedia is used to illustrate main points.

Presentation is well organized.

Speech has good flow, practiced.

Speech captures audience attention most of the time.

Multimedia is used to clarify and illustrate main points.

Presentation is well organized.

Speech is fluid, thoroughly practiced.

Speech fully captures audience attention.

 

Total Score

 

 
Table 2.0 Sample Collaborative Group Project Rubric
Student Assessment Rubric (Collaborative Group Project)
Student Name____________________

Category

Exemplary

Accomplished

Developing

Beginning

Score

Content

All unit objectives are mastered.

Topics are covered in depth. 

Many pertinent details were included.

Went beyond assignment requirements.

Most unit objectives are mastered.

Topics are covered successfully.

Included some pertinent details.

Stayed within assignment requirements.

Some unit objectives are mastered.

Topics are lacking sufficient coverage.
Few details were included.

Missing some assignment requirements.

Few unit objectives are mastered.

Topics are missing key elements.

 Few or no details were included.

Missing many assignment requirements.

 

Teamwork

Consistently demonstrated leadership and contributed significantly to the group.

Consistently on task throughout the unit.

Consistently met all due dates within the unit.

Frequently demonstrated leadership and contributed to the group.

Regularly on-task throughout the unit.

Met most of the due dates within the unit. 

Regularly contributed to group.

Usually on-task throughout the unit.

Missed some due dates within the unit.

 

Sometimes contributed to  the group
Rarely on-task throughout the
unit.

Frequently missed due dates within the unit.

 

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